Who Dropped the Ball?

It’s been three days since the officials at the Miami v. Duke game completely botched the end of the game call that cost Duke the win. In the days following the game, the officials have been suspended two games and Miami still has the W, but who really dropped the ball that led to the blown game?

Just in case you have been living under a rock here’s a recap of what happened on Saturday: Miami, down 3 points, received a last minute kick off and had 8 lateral passes which resulted in a winning touchdown. The problem is that Mark Walton threw a lateral pass with one knee down right in front of the official. There was a flag thrown but then picked up and the officials went to review that play.

Ignoring the argument about the point of instant replay, should the Atlantic Coast Conference  accept responsibility for the officials? Or does that blame fall solely on the NCAA?

It all boils down to who should be in charge of making sure the officials are given the right training.

Some would argue that it’s the individual conferences job to train their own officials. Others would say that it’s the NCAA’s job to make sure that each conference has the right training in place for officials since the NCAA is the overlord of college football.

The NCAA could easily take a page out of the National Football League’s book and have a central location for replays. Setting up one central location would take the decision out of the hands of the person sitting in the press box deigned to make the call whether a call was missed or correct. Since the NCAA is the one that sets the rules for CFB they should be the ones having to decide whether there was a flag on the play or not.

The right thing to do at this current moment is right the wrong and give Duke the win. Long term the NCAA has to take a hard look at how their officials are trained and make sure that they have complete training in order to ensure that blunders like those in the Miami/Duke game don’t tarnish college football anymore.

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